Commodore Vic 20 2-Rom Cartridge Files > Launch from a D64 image

Create a Commodore Vic 20 D64 Image That Launches (2) ROM Cartridge Images

This is a guide to create a Commodore D64 floppy drive image that you can load into your Commodore Vic 20 to run 2-Rom Cartridge files.
Feel free to use this guide and replace the games in the examples with those of your choosing!

Download your favorite 16k Commodore Vic 20 cartridge images. I’m assuming these are public domain and I’m not the host of these files.
http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/vic20/roms/16k/index.html

Download & Install a D64 editing program.
The one I recommend is DroiD64 because it’s java and can run in Windows/OSX/Linux.
http://droid64.sourceforge.net/

Download the CBM Filebrowser.

Download & Install Vice on your computer.
https://vice-emu.sourceforge.io/index.html#download

Gather your
*CBM Browser D64 file
*Favorite Vic 20 16k Cartridge Files

Open your
*DroiD64 java program
*Vice program

In example, we are going to create a D64 image with several 16K Cartridges.
For the example, we are going to add”
“Jungle Hunt”
“Moon Patrol”
“Centipede”
“Lode Runner”
“Seafox”
“Skyblazer”
“Mountain King”
“AE”

To get these games to run, first we have to write little programs that tell the Vic 20 (the real thing, an emulator or the Mister FPGA!) to combine both ROM images togther in memory, then do a reset.
What is the secret program that allows us to do that?!!?!
Believe me, I’ve searched the net and came up with nothing. I had written something several years ago and searched my retro gaming stash in the garage for it. After a while, I tracked it down. There was a file on a pi1541 SD card that had a D64 image with the secret sauce!

First, create a new D64 image using droiD64:
In the menu, select Disk1, then D64 as ‘image type’ and “2-ROM CARTRIDGES” for the name. Then OK
Save to your folder with the downloaded ROMs.
Second, open your CBM Filebrowser D64 image by finding in in the second pane on droiD64.
Refer to the image below for clarity.

Create a new D64 image using droiD64

Right click the “FB20-8k” file in the second pane, then select ‘copy file’.
Now, eject the disk in the second pane by selection the little folder with the up-arrow in the right corner of the second pane.
Navigate to where you have all of your ‘prg’ cartridge images. Hold ‘ctrl’ key and select all the images. Then copy over to the D64 image you created in the droiD64 first pane.

We now have the D64 menu and all of the game images on our D64 images.
Now we need to create our launch program using the Vice Vic 20 emulator.

With the Vice Vic 20 emulator, select ‘create and attach an empty disk image’ in the menu.
Name it ‘2-ROM D64 Menu.d64’ and hit ‘save’. Probably convienent to save this into the folder with your ROMs.

Go back to your Vice Vic 20 window, and from the menu, Edit/Paste the contents of this text:

1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”jungle hunt-6000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”jungle hunt-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

After the ‘sys64802’ on the last line of text (in the Vic 20 emulator), hit enter.
Then:
save “junglehunt”,8,1

You have saved the first launch program to the new disk.
Now you will have to follow the same idea with each of the other Cartridge images.

Make sure everything is in lower case!

“moon patrol”
1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”moonpatrol-6000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”moonpatrol-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

“centipede”
1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”centipede-2000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”centipede-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

“lode runner”
1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”lode runner-6000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”lode runner-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

“seafox”
1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”seafox-6000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”seafox-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

“skyblazer”
1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”skyblazer-6000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”skyblazer-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

“mountain king”
1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”mountain king-6000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”mountain king-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

“ae”
1 onagoto4,5
2 dr=peek(186)
3 a=1:load”ae-6000″,dr,1
4 a=2:load”ae-a000″,dr,1
5 poke37138,0:poke37139,0:poke37154,0:poke37155,0:poke37150,127:poke37166,127:sys64802

Once you have finished, eject Disk 2 in droiD64, and open your new ‘2-ROM D64 Menu.d64’ Disk image with all of the new launch files.

[droiD64_2.png]

Now copy those over to Disk 1. You can use droiD64 to move the files up using the “Up” button in the bottom menu (optional).
At this point, your D64 image is done!

Copy game launchers over to Disk 1

Feel free to transfer to a real floppy image using a Zoom interface or by opening it with Vice Vic 20 emulator -or- the Mister Vic 20 Core.
Note: You will have to expand your Vic 20 memory.
The Windows & OSX version of Vice may vary but this is the RAM expansion option for Linux:

Expand Vic 20’s RAM with Vice (Linux version shown)

To launch the disk and auto-start the menu, select File/Smart Attach, then click on the “Autostart” button.

Auto-start the CMD File Browser

Setup a DIY Retro Gaming device with all of your favorite games

Using a Raspberry Pi, create a Retro Gaming device that can connect to a TV or computer monitor (HDMI or RCA).
Equipment needed:
*Raspberry Pi 3 B+ or Raspberry Pi 4 with Power Adapter
*Micro SD Card & Reader
*PC to setup the SD Card
*USB Keyboard
*HDMI Cable or 3.5MM Video AV Component Adapter

My64 – mini ITX system in a *new* c64 case

This is a project that I definitely WILL do early next year:

I thought the whole setup was great except for one annoying thing: I don’t like cables coming out the sides of anything.  I know this is standard procedure – even a macbook pro costing thousands of dollars does this. Would have been nice to have the power on the back. But this is a clean setup, looks great and isn’t too expensive, relatively speaking.
When I got to the end and saw what the function keys did I almost spit my coffee.
Outstanding!
The mainboard/CPU mini-itx combo was really interesting. I didn’t know those existed, especially at that low price. I tried to find the board and they are out of stock everywhere but even better – the highest end version of the board is available for only $120:
Now that ARM processors are coming to the market for desktop computing, I wonder what kind of mini-computing setups we will see in the near future. I can picture something that looks like a 5″x5″x1″ shape that people shove behind a monitor that has Windows 10 and an SSD drive for under $200. We’ll see…

Commodore 64 BBS with Petscii on your PC using SyncTERM

Would you like to enter the exciting world of Commodore 64 BBS?

If you do not own an actual Commodore computer, you can visit a Commodore BBS with full Petscii (similar to ASCII) graphical support! The open source program SynchTerm allows you to do that.

If you are using a Windows or Mac OSX machine, you can download a binary here:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/syncterm/

Windows and Mac users can skip to the part below titled, “To *use* SynchTerm


If you are using Linux (preferably Ubuntu or something Debian based), you can install the program using these instructions. In a terminal:

wget 'http'://syncterm.bbsdev.net/syncterm-src.tgz
(downloads the program)
tar xvzf syncterm-src.tgz
(extracts the program)
cd syncterm-20200223/src/syncterm
(enter into the program's directory; replace "20200223" with your directory name)
sudo apt-get install libncurses-dev
sudo make
sudo make install
syncterm
(runs the program if everything goes well)

If your program refuses to ‘make’, try downloading the sourcecode from here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/syncterm/files/latest/download

*SynchTerm homepage for more details:
http://syncterm.bbsdev.net/

For reference,  here’s a list of BBSs: http://cbbsoutpost.servebbs.com/
Example of a BBS listing with name, address and port:Screenshot from 2020-02-23 13-11-08

To *use* SynchTerm, click on the icon.

Click in the area of the “Directory” (First box)Screenshot from 2020-02-23 12-50-45

Select your keyboard’s “insert” key and type in the BBS nameScreenshot from 2020-02-23 12-51-58

Select “Telnet” for connection typeScreenshot from 2020-02-23 12-52-17

Enter in the address of the BBS you want to visit. Screenshot from 2020-02-23 12-52-34

Select F2 to edit the entry you just created for fine tuning:

TCP Port: 6400 (that’s just an example)Screenshot from 2020-02-23 12-52-54
Choose “C64” for Screen ModeScreenshot from 2020-02-23 12-53-10
Esc to save
Now highlight the new entry and hit enter. If the BBS is available and you entered in the information properly, you should see something like this. You will need to create an account. Enjoy!

Screenshot from 2020-02-23 12-50-01

Screenshot from 2020-02-23 12-50-23

Install Retropie on Ubuntu 18.04.03

I found a nice guide to installing Retropie on Ubuntu 18.04.03 at a website called markontech and it works brilliantly.

sudo apt-get install -y git dialog unzip xmlstarlet
git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/RetroPie/RetroPie-Setup.git
cd RetroPie-Setup
sudo ./retropie_setup.sh

Once the Retro-Pie install script is running, you will want to do a Basic Install and then navigate back to the menu and install the desired optional packages.

One thing I have learned: if you copy the retropie directory to a thumb drive (once it’s setup) each time you have a new setup, if you plug the thumb drive in, the computer will automatically copy the roms and bios files to the new install when emulation station is running. 🙂

Commodore 64 (Vic 20, Pet, etc) emulator from Raspberry Pi Raspbian

I can confirm this install method (source) worked with a Raspberry Pi 4 using Raspbian Buster.
Compiles Vice and installs into /usr/local/bin. Initial launch reports a sound issue. If you go into settings (F12), there’s a sound configuration you can change to “Alsa”.

# get dependencies – this may take a long time and ~ 1.5 GB
sudo apt install autoconf automake build-essential byacc dos2unix flex libavcodec-dev libavformat-dev libgtk2.0-cil-dev libgtkglext1-dev libmp3lame-dev libmpg123-dev libpcap-dev libpulse-dev libreadline-dev libswscale-dev libvte-dev libxaw7-dev subversion texi2html texinfo yasm libgtk3.0-cil-dev xa65 libsdl2-dev

mkdir -p src
cd src
svn checkout https://svn.code.sf.net/p/vice-emu/code/trunk trunk
cd trunk/vice
./autogen.sh
./configure
make -j4
sudo make install

3D printing discussion/Urban Knish Podcast

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/631513482″ params=”color=#ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true&visual=true” width=”100%” height=”300″ iframe=”true” /]

3D printed pi1541 case & Wimodem case for Commodore 64

Comgrow Creality Ender 3 Pro 3D Printer
Comgrow 3D Printer PLA Filament 1.75mm 1KG Spool
Thingiverse 3D models
Some free CAD programs for designing 3D parts

Public Domain music played during the podcast

8bitdo Sega Genesis Receiver Review

8bitdo Sega Genesis Receiver Review

The 8bitdo Genesis Receiver allows your Sega Genesis or Mega Drive to use a modern gamepad such as the PS4, PS3, XBox or Wii U (pictured) as well as a wide assortment of Bluetooth controllers. Also pictured on the right is another device used in a similar way for devices that accept USB such as the Nintendo Switch, the Mini Playstation, PCs, etc.

Podcast:

Youtube video:
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESpU2YoT_l0]